ABCs of the BOP by L. A. Johnson

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In ABCs of the BOP: A Teacher’s Prison Primer, L. A. Johnson writes about the 55 months she spent in prison for crimes she did not commit. Johnson talks about her initial despair; her battles, both legal and emotional; her hope; disappointment; and eventual acceptance of the plight she found herself in. The memoir also describes routine procedures, work, prison staff, other inmates, and how her faith in God brought her out; baffled, but not bitter.

Nelson Mandela said “After one has been in prison, it is the small things that one appreciates: being able to take a walk whenever one wants, going into a shop and buying a newspaper, speaking or choosing to remain silent. The simple act of being able to control one’s person.” Johnson was released from prison 5 months after Mandela died.
Available on Amazon

“Seemed like most of the spelling mistakes are typos”

Five Star Review on Amazon By Debra E. Vida

Interesting book about serving time in a federal prison. The author needs to use her education to edit this book – lots of spelling and grammar errors. Seemed like most of the spelling mistakes are typos. According to the author’s accounts of other inmates, there are few guilty people in our prisons – everyone was framed or found guilty by mistake. Hope her life after prison is better!

About the Author

My name is LaWanda. For my first book, “The ABCs of the BOP,” I’ve adopted the pen name L.A. Johnson. After reviewing my book, my granddaughter referred to me as “Piper.” That made me feel real good.

I earned an A.A. from Fresno City College, a B.A. from Fresno State and a M.S. and Ph.D. in Educational Administration from Purdue University. I retired from the Los Angeles School District with 26 years of teaching service credit.

From my humble beginnings in Hamlin, Texas to my current home in Aberdeen, Washington, I’ve journeyed far; that is meant in both the literal as well as the metaphorical sense.

I am one of the many who was wrongfully investigated, convicted, and incarcerated for crimes that I did not commit. As of today, I am still fighting to have my conviction overturned. I have faith that one day I will succeed.

Nelson Mandela said “After one has been in prison, it is the small things that one appreciates: being able to take a walk whenever one wants, going into a shop and buying a newspaper, speaking or choosing to remain silent. The simple act of being able to control one’s person.”

I have found that to be quite true.

Other books that I have written are:

Fanny Marion Jackson Coppin: First Black Female Principal

Miss Forten of Philadelphia

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