Who Killed Edie Montgomery? by C.M. Blackwood

Life’s a bowl of cherries, as they say. Until someone chops your head off. In the year 1933, an alcoholic, cynical 32-year-old named Mary Meade inherits a manor. Her great-uncle just passed away, so his house, and all his money, goes to her. When she arrives at the house, though, she finds much more than…

Life’s a bowl of cherries, as they say. Until someone chops your head off.

In the year 1933, an alcoholic, cynical 32-year-old named Mary Meade inherits a manor. Her great-uncle just passed away, so his house, and all his money, goes to her. When she arrives at the house, though, she finds much more than she bargained for: including strange servants, a murder mystery, and – oh, did we forget to mention? – GHOSTS.

Despite her cold demeanor, Mary is romantically drawn to a spirit named Jessica Price, who was killed in 1879 by a madman named John Drum. Mary and Jessica fall in love, but of course, the story is much more complicated than that.

Shortly after the death of Mary’s great-uncle, a young woman named Edie Montgomery was found gutted and beheaded on his property. Now her spirit is trapped inside the manor.

John Drum killed Jessica Price. But who killed Edie Montgomery?

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“A Page-turning Paranormal Romance”

Five Star Review on Amazon By T. A. Peters

Set in England, young Mary Meade comes of age during the First World War. Thanks to her beauty, she has many men, some handsome and many rich, who would gladly marry her, but to her father’s consternation she rejects them all. When Mary reveals her yearnings for another young woman to her mother, her mother attempts to gently dissuade Mary from such a path, but a few years later inadvertently walks in to discover the two young women romantically entangled in her daughter’s bed and is quickly felled by a heart attack. With the loss of her mother, Mary begins to follow in the footsteps of her father leading a life that may as well wind up a waste fuelled by constant daily doses of gin. But in 1933, an escape from her paternal prison in her hometown of Marshdale, and an opportunity for a new life, presents when Mr. Gibbons, a solicitor, shows up and presents Mary with an offer of her recently deceased Great Uncle Gregory Hammersmith’s home as well as the tidy sum of 100,000 pounds. The move to the house known as Meade Manor in the town of Edelton would appear to be enough of an escape for Mary, only she comes to discover that the sordid history of the manor, stretching nearly so far as its building in the previous century, is one filled with maniacal murders and in the end Mary finds that it is the ghosts haunting her new home’s halls who possess the ability to breathe fresh life into her. At the same time that Mary finds herself falling in love with the spirit of a woman drowned on the property by the malevolent, and decades long-dead, John Drum, she must face up to the living crisis of discovering who is again decapitating young women on the grounds of Meade Manor, and so the titular mystery is set into motion with the question of who killed Edie Montgomery?

C. M. Blackwood’s “Who Killed Edie Montgomery” is a darkly invigorating book bound to mesmerize the reader with its mobile plot and engaging characters. With a touch of classic gothic horror overshadowed by the murder mystery and paranormal romance, Blackwood’s latest book combines the best writing elements of the Brontë Sisters, Agatha Christie and Stephenie Meyer into one volume liable to flash through the reader’s ken with the speed of a shooting star. True to style, the narrative is written in authentic British fashion; the third-person direct reach out to the reader feels as genuine today as in the time of Jane Austen and only further serves to keep the pages turning. Mary Meade herself makes for an interesting protagonist to contemplate; as in any such literary venture in the paranormal genre, questions of the precise foundations of her character abound when considering the nature of her relationships in regards to the living persons whom she mostly shuns or abuses while instead quickly, truly finding love with Jessica. The morality of that feeling, that decision, is scarcely touched upon as Mary becomes driven in her living quest to discover the truth of who the real killer is; only when she finds herself literally put in to the same deadly position as Jessica and emerges triumphantly with her lover at her side is the ambiguity of her personality swept away.

About the Author

I’m an indie author who specializes in PG-13 lesbian romances and fairy tales. It’s my aim to share both my love for writing and my love for God. Much construction is currently taking place, but at the moment I have for sale: one mystery set in 1933, one romance circa 1950, two fairy tales, two short stories — and a partridge in a pear tree.

Reviews are welcomed with open arms! Drop by my blog for a visit, or shoot me an email. I’d love to connect.

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