Medousa by Michael Butchin

Classic Greek mythology paints Medousa as a serpent-haired monster who turns people to stone if they merely look at her face. But what made Medousa such a monster?   Author Michael F. Butchin retells the classic story from Medousa’s point of view, taking readers back to Sparta, where her family is violently murdered by the…

Classic Greek mythology paints Medousa as a serpent-haired monster who turns people to stone if they merely look at her face. But what made Medousa such a monster?

 

Author Michael F. Butchin retells the classic story from Medousa’s point of view, taking readers back to Sparta, where her family is violently murdered by the Spartan Krypteia, and she is sold as a slave to the royal house of the Eurypontids.

 

When Medousa is granted her freedom she devotes herself to Athena, the Goddess of wisdom, courage, and the strategy of war and trains to be a priestess, hoping for kindness and acceptance only to suffer rape and the curse that turns her into a Gorgon.

 

Fleeing to a life of solitude, Medousa is driven mad by her loneliness and pain, taking out her anger on travelers who cross her path.

 

In the end it is the Titans, not the Gods, who give her the care and love she longs for, but will she ever find the healing she so deeply desires?

Available on Amazon

“An exploration of Greek Myth with a modern eye.”

Five Star Review on Amazon by Robert

Mythology looks very different to the modern eye, even in the fantasy genre where magic, gods, and heroes are accepted parts of fictional worlds.
In classical myth, Medousa is the story of a monster, a priestess raped by one god, punished with the loss of her humanity by another, and finally slain by the half-divine son of a third.

Michael Butchin turns the myth on its head by looking at the story from the point of view of a young girl taken as a slave, grown into a young woman punished for refusing to suicide after her rape. This becomes a powerful story of love, grief, and redemption in the face of tragedy.

Other mythic and historical figures make appearances, again as viewed through modern eyes, offering opportunities for comedy, tragedy, and philosophy, which resonates well within the cultural context Butchin is exploring.

Medousa is appropriate for young adult audiences, but does contain (unavoidably) both sexual themes and violence. The book also explores gender roles and GLBTQ themes, again within the context of Greek myth and culture.

About the Author

I was born, according to the official records, in the Year of the Ram, under the Element of Fire, when Johnson ruled the land with a heavy heart; in the Cradle of Liberty, to a family of bohemians.

I studied Chinese language and literature at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. I spent some years in Taiwan teaching kindergarten during the day, and ESOL during the evenings. And although I have spent much of my career in education and language pedagogy, I currently work as a faceless drone in a corporate call center. I am also an unlikely martial artist.

I have spent much of my life amongst actors, singers, musicians, movie stars, beautiful cultists, Taoist immortals, renegade monks, and at least one martial arts tzaddik. I am an ordained Minister of the Church of the Latter Day Dude; I am available for weddings, convocations, lectures, and dude-mitzvahs.

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