The Death of Anyone by D. J. Swykert

Detroit homicide Detective Bonnie Benham has been transferred from narcotics for using more than arresting and is working the case of a killer of adolescent girls. Csi collects Dna evidence from the scene of the latest victim, which had not been detected on the other victims. But no suspect turns up in the Fbi database….

51PS8XeIL7L._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Detroit homicide Detective Bonnie Benham has been transferred from narcotics for using more than arresting and is working the case of a killer of adolescent girls. Csi collects Dna evidence from the scene of the latest victim, which had not been detected on the other victims. But no suspect turns up in the Fbi database. Due to the notoriety of the crimes a task force is put together with Bonnie as the lead detective, and she implores the D.A. to use an as yet unapproved type of a Dna Search in an effort to identify the killer. Homicide Detective Neil Jensen, with his own history of drug and alcohol problems, understands Bonnie’s frailty and the two detectives become inseparable as they track this killer of children.

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I call this “Gritty Police Drama””

Five Star Review on AmazonĀ By J B Bergstad

I recently finished Death of Anyone by D.J. Swykert. This is the third Swykert book I have read and I can promise if you like McBain, MacDonald or have ever read Peter Robinson’s tales of British Inspector Alan Banks you’ll love Swykert. The authors mentioned above write good police procedurals, but Swykert goes these well known authors one better. Swykert writes what I would term, “Grit Police Drama.” In the Death of Anyone, Swykert begins playing with the mind of his audience with his choice of title. D.O.A. a.k.a. Death of Anyone. This book features a lady cop, Bonnie Benham, who takes no prisoners in her pursuit of a child killer and rapist who leaves no semen or other DNA evidence. Benham, a woman raised within the tough environment of the streets of Detroit is relentless in her investigation. Three men in her life, all police officers, help the audience understand what motivates this gritty heroine, and at same time, gives us a look at a softer Benham, capable of deep feeling, deeper love and a vulnerability the reader is surprised to find. Swykert writes not like he has done his research, which is evident, but like he has lived and experienced similar events. His writing, unlike those who have never served, reflect his philosophical, yet realistic look at the human animal in its diametrically opposed extremes of pure goodness and savage evil. I also like the fact Swykert reintroduces characters from his earlier work, Children of the Enemy, and uses them to further the plot points in Death of Anyone. I highly recommend Death of Anyone and if you haven’t yet done so, I further recommend you catch up with Children of the Enemy. Both books are unique in subject matter and storytelling style. J B Bergstad

About the Author

His work has appeared in The Tampa Review, Detroit News, Monarch Review, Lunch Ticket, Coe Review, Gravel, Zodiac Review, Barbaric Yawp and Bull. His books include Children of the Enemy, Alpha Wolves, The Death of Anyone, The Pool Boy’s Beatitude and Maggie Elizabeth Harrington. You can find him at: www.magicmasterminds.com/djswykert. He is a wolf expert.

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