The Ghost in the Closet

Should she ignore the ghost and walk away, allowing the shelter to close?
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Should she ignore the ghost and walk away, allowing the shelter to close?

Book Description:

5***** Reviews: “not your usual take on a ghost story” & “a fast paced plot with well described scenes and characters.”

Dumdie Swartz’s ability to see ghosts has gotten her into scrapes all her life, ever since she was little. In her senior years, it takes its toll when she gets fired from her job and loses her apartment as a result of her gift. Now homeless, Dumdie is forced to sleep in her car in a shopping mall car park.

When she gets the chance of a room in an old house that has been transformed into a shelter she jumps at the opportunity to sleep in a comfy bed once more, but she cannot escape from the dead. Just when it looks like her life is beginning to turn around, the ghost of the former occupant of her room reaches out for her assistance to find her will and save the shelter.

Dumdie is forced into a choice. Should she risk upsetting the rest of the occupants by helping the spirit to find peace?. Or, should she ignore the ghost and walk away, allowing the shelter to close?

Download this Tale of Andor, set after the Demon Wars, for Free. If you like the read, a review would be appreciated.

M.K. Theodoratus states in her bio as a fantasy author, `Magic and fantasy have been part of my life ... like forever. I started telling stories after my imaginary friend came to play with me on the front porch when I was about three. By the time I was in sixth grade, I was reading any story connected with magical worlds, ghosts, witches, and things paranormal, though I didn't much care for blood-drinking vampires. Still don't, with few exceptions. Then, a teacher introduced me to the idea that I could write my made-up stories down. Now I write fantasy. While grumpy Far Isles Half-Elven are closest to my heart, I play in worlds that deal with half-elves, gargoyles, ghosties and other magical beings. I'm one of those early writer types. Wrote my first novel in the sixth grade. The teacher demanded a short story for an English assignment. She got am unfinished Nancy Drew pastiche -- "The Clue of the Clay Cats" -- and gave me a "C" because, at 25 handwritten pages long, I hadn't finished the story. [Most of the other kids only wrote two to four pages -- *snarl*, *snarl*. Do you think the grade still bothers me?]

By the next summer, I had finished a novel-length story. Even borrowed my mother's typewriter to type it. My one reader -- the children's librarian -- thought it was pretty good. So, I wrote more short stories for fun. Even sold some to the children's story sections in a couple newspapers. They are buried in the sands of time. Writing stories became addictive. You are now seeing the result.' And so we meet this Delightful lady in her story THE GHOST IN THE CLOSET. Dumbie is a recently jobless homeless older lady who has been living in her car (as has her friend Hanna) until they take up residence in the Archinhauser Shelter for Homeless Women. Despite the fact that living in a home is better than dwelling in a winter car, Dumbie has an additional problem to the steps she must climb to her room, the KP duty she inherits from the foreman of the home - Dumbie sees ghosts. It is a problem with which she has lived since childhood, some referring to her `gift' as having TIAs. But as Dumbie and Hanna settle in, Dumbie discovers she shares a room with a none to complacent former tenant of the home - a lady with inheritance problems regarding the Archinhauser home. Though it may sound a pit preposterous, the way Theodoratus spells it out (!) gives a taste of the high quality of writing of the book: `Dumdie tried to pull away from Hanna's digging fingernails. She struggled to keep her voice calm. "W-w-who are you? I'm D-dumdie." Her stutter returned with a vengeance. "Mayebelle. This was my home, but my nephew and his wife kept me locked me in the closet before I lost my body." The ghost frowned . "Things are different in here. Where did all the boxes and trunks go? Did you steal them?" The air dropped a dozen degrees as she paused. "No, it must've been James." A bit of warmth flowed back into the room. "The room was b-bare, except for the furniture, wh-wh-when I came here....etc' Writing like this is rare and is merely a brief taste for the sophistication of Theodoratus' dealings with age, social issues such as homelessness, ghosts, inheritance issues, and much more. She is a delight to read! Grady Harp, June 14

-- Grady Harp

M. K. Theodoratus (Author)

Author has recently published the book ▸The Ghost in the Closet. This book is avaiable on leading bookstores, get your copy now and help the author by writing a review of the book.
I’m one of those weird people who has played with fantasy as long as she can remember. Had a pretend friend by the time I was three, play acted elaborate fantasies even after I learned not to talk about them, read loads of Silver Age comic books, and discovered Oz, A. L. Merritt, Andre Norton, and Fritz Leiber before my teens. Some of my favorite authors now include Alexander, Briggs, Belcher, Cooper, Croogon, Pierce, Butcher, Elkins, McCrumb, Gaiman, O’Connell, etc. etc. etc. The gears changed to include writing fantasy after the sixth grade. Before then, mysteries ala Nancy Drew, were my favorites. Most of my fiction writing has been lost through the years. Must admit, though, I still have the Clue of the Clay Cats, written in the sixth and seventh grade, sitting in some file drawer. Many fantasy worlds entertain me…but I’ve only written in two since I started writing fiction again consistently. My main two worlds are Andor where demons prey upon humans and other supernatural events occur and the Marches of the Far Isles were the elder Half-Elven fight socio-political change. Mostly I’ve published shorter fantasy which is mostly free. My Andor short stories include Night for the Gargoyles [which inspired Andor and There Be Demons], Showdown at Crossings [prequel to There Be Demons], Doom Comes for a Sold Soul, and The Ghost in the Closet. Visit my author website for more information about my writing–www.mktheodoratus.com. As for social media, I blog about books [aka book reviews] at kaytheod.blogspot.com almost weekly. I also post on Facebook as M. K. Theodoratus, Fantasy Writer]. Yeah, there’s Twitter [@kaytheod] to promote mostly and GoodReads– https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5067004.M_K_Theodoratus. For fun, I do Pinterest and enjoy my Gorey pics. If you comment on my Facebook page, I usually answer back.

M.K. Theodoratus states in her bio as a fantasy author, `Magic and fantasy have been part of my life ... like forever. I started telling stories after my imaginary friend came to play with me on the front porch when I was about three. By the time I was in sixth grade, I was reading any story connected with magical worlds, ghosts, witches, and things paranormal, though I didn't much care for blood-drinking vampires. Still don't, with few exceptions. Then, a teacher introduced me to the idea that I could write my made-up stories down. Now I write fantasy. While grumpy Far Isles Half-Elven are closest to my heart, I play in worlds that deal with half-elves, gargoyles, ghosties and other magical beings. I'm one of those early writer types. Wrote my first novel in the sixth grade. The teacher demanded a short story for an English assignment. She got am unfinished Nancy Drew pastiche -- "The Clue of the Clay Cats" -- and gave me a "C" because, at 25 handwritten pages long, I hadn't finished the story. [Most of the other kids only wrote two to four pages -- *snarl*, *snarl*. Do you think the grade still bothers me?]

By the next summer, I had finished a novel-length story. Even borrowed my mother's typewriter to type it. My one reader -- the children's librarian -- thought it was pretty good. So, I wrote more short stories for fun. Even sold some to the children's story sections in a couple newspapers. They are buried in the sands of time. Writing stories became addictive. You are now seeing the result.' And so we meet this Delightful lady in her story THE GHOST IN THE CLOSET. Dumbie is a recently jobless homeless older lady who has been living in her car (as has her friend Hanna) until they take up residence in the Archinhauser Shelter for Homeless Women. Despite the fact that living in a home is better than dwelling in a winter car, Dumbie has an additional problem to the steps she must climb to her room, the KP duty she inherits from the foreman of the home - Dumbie sees ghosts. It is a problem with which she has lived since childhood, some referring to her `gift' as having TIAs. But as Dumbie and Hanna settle in, Dumbie discovers she shares a room with a none to complacent former tenant of the home - a lady with inheritance problems regarding the Archinhauser home. Though it may sound a pit preposterous, the way Theodoratus spells it out (!) gives a taste of the high quality of writing of the book: `Dumdie tried to pull away from Hanna's digging fingernails. She struggled to keep her voice calm. "W-w-who are you? I'm D-dumdie." Her stutter returned with a vengeance. "Mayebelle. This was my home, but my nephew and his wife kept me locked me in the closet before I lost my body." The ghost frowned . "Things are different in here. Where did all the boxes and trunks go? Did you steal them?" The air dropped a dozen degrees as she paused. "No, it must've been James." A bit of warmth flowed back into the room. "The room was b-bare, except for the furniture, wh-wh-when I came here....etc' Writing like this is rare and is merely a brief taste for the sophistication of Theodoratus' dealings with age, social issues such as homelessness, ghosts, inheritance issues, and much more. She is a delight to read! Grady Harp, June 14

-- Grady Harp

The Ghost in the Closet by M. K. Theodoratus is a great little short story about a young woman who goes by Dumdie. Dumdie has been teased by her family and others as a result of her gift to see spirits. This “gift” has recently lead to the loss of her job and her home. She is fortunate enough to be given a chance to get herself back on her feet when she is given a spot at the Archinhauser Shelter for Homeless Women. As soon as she moves in, however, she can tell that something is amiss and is afraid that her gift may resurface and get her kicked out of yet another place. While this story was very short it was also very well written. I liked the element of suspense in the story that came from what will happen to Dumbdie and the other women as a result of the ghost in the closet.

-- Robin Perron
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