Thievery: Catholic Church Exposed!

Thousands more priests and staff members were embezzling and stealing, giving root to the thievery scandal in the Catholic Church.

Sex Abuse is Not the Catholic Church’s Only Crime

Thievery is a documentary based upon the collection of ninety-seven (non-sex abuse) cases uncovered through a comprehensive investigation of legal cases, newspaper stories, and articles reported from 2002 to 2018.

Throughout this period, sex abuse scandals dominated comment about the Catholic Church. And rightfully so! It’s estimated that these priests imposed their will upon over 100,000 innocent children. But priests were not the only ones engaged in deviant behavior, and sex abuse was not the Church’s only form of criminality. Thousands more priests and staff members were embezzling and stealing, giving root to the thievery scandal in the Catholic Church.

Thievery traces the evolution of the thievery scandal, year-by-year, from 2002, until its crescendo in 2018, as illustrated by the following headlines:

  • Priest Gets 3 Years for Stealing $1.3 Million
  • Priests Indicted in $8 Million Scam
  • Woman Sentenced for Stealing $2.5 Million
  • Priest Accused of Stealing over $1 Million for “Sex Master”
  • Priest Sentenced to 5-years, Ordered to Pay Back $2 Million
  • Priest Accused of Embezzling $5 Million

Thievery uses actual news stories to document the types of financial mismanagement perpetrated by unethical priests and staff members.

Revealed:

  • How depraved bishops covered up countless cases of theft
  • How Church officials failed to hold bishops and priests accountable
  • Insights as to how “faith-based” trust is financially paralyzing the parishes
  • How the Church’s system must be revised to establish strong money management procedures in each parish, as well as in many dioceses.
  • How the Church hierarchy must take urgent action to restore credibility

Is the Catholic Church too big to fail?

With estimates of thievery in the U.S. Catholic Church now surpassing $1.2B annually, and with legal costs for sexual abuse cases escalating, operational expenses growing, the number of lapsed Catholics increasing, and the percentage of contributions dwindling, Thievery, raises the daunting question: Is the Catholic Church too big to fail?

Thoroughly researched and objectively presented, Thievery is a true eye-opener and a must-read for those concerned about truth, justice and the future of the Catholic Church.