Misreading Judas

by Robert Wahler (Author)

How Biblical Scholars Missed the Biggest Story of All Time

Book Description:​

The Gospel of Judas is the most important discovery in history. It bridges the gap between Eastern mystic teaching, Gnosticism, and the three Middle Eastern Abrahamic religions, informing all of them. Unfortunately, the Christianity-biased scholars assigned to its interpretation and those who have followed them do not understand it — at all. They miss that Judas is the gnostic sacrifice, and that there is no traditional orthodox Jesus sacrificed – in the Gospel of Judas or in the Bible. Therefore, they miss the most important revelation of all time: that ‘Jesus’ didn’t die to save anyone, and that he was in truth preceded and succeeded by other Masters of equal stature. Here from gnostic texts that only just recently arose from the desert sands of Egypt, phoenix-like, is the detailed story of how the New Testament canonical ‘Betrayal of Jesus’ became the inversion of the gnostic mastership installation story of James the Just, first-century savior. The true origin of the Christian message and its nullification of mystic Truth can now, at long last, be fully told.

Connecting verses from the Gnostic Apocalypse of James to the New Testament narrative showing that Judas was James in the Canonical Inversions:

First Apocalypse of James
“I have given you a sign” (NHC 24:10) “gave them a sign” [the “kiss”]
(Matt. 26:48).

“Cup of bitterness to the sons of light” (25:15) “let this cup pass from me”
(Matt. 26:39).

“This is the second Master” (30:25) “Those who seek enter through you”
(Second Apoc. 55:1) “I know whom I have chosen.” (John 13:18).

“Then the disciples dispersed, but James remained in prayer” (30:25) “he
withdrew and prayed” (Luke 22:41).

“I am he who was within me” (31:15) “I know whom I have chosen” and
“I am he” (John 13:18-19).

“You have embraced and kissed me” (32:5) “He said ‘Hail Master!’ and
kissed him” (Matt. 26:49).

“You are aware and stopped this prayer” (32:5) “Sit here while I pray”
(Matt. 26:36).

“The flesh is weak” (32:20) “the flesh is weak” (Matt. 26:41).

“It will receive what has been ordained for it” (32:20) “thy will be done”
(Matt. 26:42).

“A multitude will arm themselves against you” (33:5) “band of soldiers with
weapons” (John 18:3, Mark 14:43).

Also by the author: The Bible says Saviors – Obadiah 1:21 from Xlibris Publishers

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What if someone provided proof that our long-held beliefs about Jesus of Nazareth were incorrect? Author Robert Wahler is attempting to do just that with his 2016 non-fiction book, Misreading Judas: How Biblical Scholars Missed the Biggest Story of All Time. The author’s thesis offers a new interpretation of the relationship between Jesus and Judas. Wahler asserts the story of Judas was not a betrayal and sacrifice of Jesus at all but rather a self-sacrifice by Judas as part of the Gnostic tradition called mastership succession. The author’s research holds both Jesus and Judas in a very different light from that of orthodox religious teachings. Could Jesus really have been merely one in a succession of many spiritual Masters? The Gnostic Gospel of Judas was likely composed by second-century Gnostic Christians. The surprisingly intact papyrus containing the text first surfaced publicly in 1970. It reveals conversations between Jesus and Judas Iscariot. Wahler claims no one has correctly translated the Gospel of Judas until his research emerged. He faults the Christian scholars who initially interpreted the text, saying they were ignorant to the Gnostic orientation necessary to adequately understand the ancient writings. In Eastern spiritual traditions, mysticism is the practice of spiritual knowing (gnosis) through meditation and other vehicles for merging with Spirit. A longtime student of Eastern mysticism, Wahler insists the story of Judas and all of the Gnostic Gospels must be interpreted through the lens of mysticism. In addition to Gnostic texts and the New Testament, Wahler’s comparative analysis draws from the work of Eastern spiritual teacher Maharaj Charan Singh. From this viewpoint, Wahler contends when Jesus tells Judas to “sacrifice the man who bears me,” he is referring to a mystical sacrifice, not the physical sacrifice of Jesus. In the mystical interpretation, Jesus is telling Judas that he (Judas) will sacrifice his individual self to become one with his spiritual Master. This form of self-sacrifice is a traditional practice by the Gnostics of that time. In addition, the author asserts that Judas is the same person as the lesser-known apostle, James the Just. If they are one in the same, according to Wahler, then the Judas-as-betrayer story was a cover for what really happened: James (Judas) succeeded Jesus as Master. Robert Wahler maintains that the mystical self-sacrifice by Judas, and his subsequent mastership, was misinterpreted and “inverted” by biblical scholars to hide the uncomfortable truth that other great Masters preceded and succeeded Jesus. The simple existence of a succession of Masters through self-sacrifice challenges the conventional knowledge of Jesus’ role in history. Wahler is not saying that Jesus wasn’t a prophet and great spiritual Master. He is saying Jesus wasn’t the only one and that he didn’t die for anyone’s sins. Wahler challenges, “There is no reason to think that the New Testament canon is the original text of the story of the first-century Master, Jesus Christ.” For a relatively short book, 102 pages, Misreading Judas delivers volumes worth of sound comparative analysis. It is packed with quotations and line-by-line examination. I thought I might tire of the density but found I was fascinated by Wahler’s methods and conclusions. Misreading Judas is not an easy read but is worth the effort. Some of the logic is complicated but at the same time convincing. Wahler’s writing is clear and easy to follow. The book’s organization facilitates the reader’s understanding of the material. Divided into four sections, the book traverses The Gospel of Judas, The Nag Hammadi Library, The New Testament, and resources on mystic readings of scriptures. Considering the complex punctuation required for the dense quotations, parenthetical and bracketed insertions, I was surprised that there were so few errors. The editor gave impeccable attention to precision in grammar and punctuation. A summary at the end of the book reviews the passages of text that directly support the thesis. Both the summary and Wahler’s concluding remarks help to connect the dots. Note: In deference to Eastern mysticism, Robert Wahler capitalizes the word “Master” in his book. I have done the same for consistency. Wahler is not entirely alone in his progressive positions. Some cursory research on my part revealed that there is growing consensus among religious scholars for Wahler’s view of Judas as beloved and obedient disciple, rather than betrayer. The author’s belief in the succession of Masters is, however, another story. This is where he is out on a limb. Save non-Christians and very progressive theologians, support for this conclusion is less enthusiastic, to be sure. I rate Misreading Judas: How Biblical Scholars Missed the Biggest Story of All Time 4 out of 4 stars. If you are open-minded and are interested in biblical history or Eastern mysticism, I think you will be fast captivated by this book. If you are outraged by Wahler’s conclusions, you might enjoy being engaged in what can only be described as the debate of the millennia. - Eva Darrington, Online Book Club

Robert Wahler (Author)

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I am a Satsangi with the Radha Soami Satsang Beas Philosophical Organization of Beas, India. The current Master is Baba Gurinder Singh. www.rssb.org Last year, I finally got around to writing the real story of the Gospel of Judas. I am thrilled to offer it to everyone. We now have, with the discovery of the Gospel of Judas and the Nag Hammadi Library (I think they are connected), the sources of the New Testament story of the Betrayal of Jesus. What this says about the Gospel story of Jesus is fatal. If JUDAS is the sacrifice, then Jesus cannot be. Both Judas and Jesus were covers for James the Just, and it is easily seen in the James and Peter Apocalypses of Nag Hammadi. I hope now we can all come together over the mistaken theologies of Judaism, Islam and most of all, Christianity, and see that Masters come to the world continuously for the salvation of the ready. My first book, newly rewritten under new title, is “The Bible says ‘Saviors’ – Obadiah 1:21” . It contains a description of the most important revelation concerning the New Testament scriptures since the gospels were written and canonized. The gospel “Betrayal of Jesus” story is actually a cover fiction for the installation of James the Just as successor savior. I am actively looking for an agent to publish a new book on the Gospel of Judas discovery through a major publisher. In it Judas is the sacrifice — NOT JESUS as most think! He is a stand-in for James the Just, leader of the Jerusalem Assembly. Dr. Robert Eisenman found ‘Judas’ was James, but not a Master. No scholar knows this. I know, I talk to them all, or try to. Ultimately, there is a possible multimedia documentary planned. Misreading Judas: How Biblical Scholars Missed the Biggest Story of All Time, New Pinnacle Book Award winner.

Misreading Judas

What if someone provided proof that our long-held beliefs about Jesus of Nazareth were incorrect? Author Robert Wahler is attempting to do just that with his 2016 non-fiction book, Misreading Judas: How Biblical Scholars Missed the Biggest Story of All Time. The author’s thesis offers a new interpretation of the relationship between Jesus and Judas. Wahler asserts the story of Judas was not a betrayal and sacrifice of Jesus at all but rather a self-sacrifice by Judas as part of the Gnostic tradition called mastership succession. The author’s research holds both Jesus and Judas in a very different light from that of orthodox religious teachings. Could Jesus really have been merely one in a succession of many spiritual Masters? The Gnostic Gospel of Judas was likely composed by second-century Gnostic Christians. The surprisingly intact papyrus containing the text first surfaced publicly in 1970. It reveals conversations between Jesus and Judas Iscariot. Wahler claims no one has correctly translated the Gospel of Judas until his research emerged. He faults the Christian scholars who initially interpreted the text, saying they were ignorant to the Gnostic orientation necessary to adequately understand the ancient writings. In Eastern spiritual traditions, mysticism is the practice of spiritual knowing (gnosis) through meditation and other vehicles for merging with Spirit. A longtime student of Eastern mysticism, Wahler insists the story of Judas and all of the Gnostic Gospels must be interpreted through the lens of mysticism. In addition to Gnostic texts and the New Testament, Wahler’s comparative analysis draws from the work of Eastern spiritual teacher Maharaj Charan Singh. From this viewpoint, Wahler contends when Jesus tells Judas to “sacrifice the man who bears me,” he is referring to a mystical sacrifice, not the physical sacrifice of Jesus. In the mystical interpretation, Jesus is telling Judas that he (Judas) will sacrifice his individual self to become one with his spiritual Master. This form of self-sacrifice is a traditional practice by the Gnostics of that time. In addition, the author asserts that Judas is the same person as the lesser-known apostle, James the Just. If they are one in the same, according to Wahler, then the Judas-as-betrayer story was a cover for what really happened: James (Judas) succeeded Jesus as Master. Robert Wahler maintains that the mystical self-sacrifice by Judas, and his subsequent mastership, was misinterpreted and “inverted” by biblical scholars to hide the uncomfortable truth that other great Masters preceded and succeeded Jesus. The simple existence of a succession of Masters through self-sacrifice challenges the conventional knowledge of Jesus’ role in history. Wahler is not saying that Jesus wasn’t a prophet and great spiritual Master. He is saying Jesus wasn’t the only one and that he didn’t die for anyone’s sins. Wahler challenges, “There is no reason to think that the New Testament canon is the original text of the story of the first-century Master, Jesus Christ.” For a relatively short book, 102 pages, Misreading Judas delivers volumes worth of sound comparative analysis. It is packed with quotations and line-by-line examination. I thought I might tire of the density but found I was fascinated by Wahler’s methods and conclusions. Misreading Judas is not an easy read but is worth the effort. Some of the logic is complicated but at the same time convincing. Wahler’s writing is clear and easy to follow. The book’s organization facilitates the reader’s understanding of the material. Divided into four sections, the book traverses The Gospel of Judas, The Nag Hammadi Library, The New Testament, and resources on mystic readings of scriptures. Considering the complex punctuation required for the dense quotations, parenthetical and bracketed insertions, I was surprised that there were so few errors. The editor gave impeccable attention to precision in grammar and punctuation. A summary at the end of the book reviews the passages of text that directly support the thesis. Both the summary and Wahler’s concluding remarks help to connect the dots. Note: In deference to Eastern mysticism, Robert Wahler capitalizes the word “Master” in his book. I have done the same for consistency. Wahler is not entirely alone in his progressive positions. Some cursory research on my part revealed that there is growing consensus among religious scholars for Wahler’s view of Judas as beloved and obedient disciple, rather than betrayer. The author’s belief in the succession of Masters is, however, another story. This is where he is out on a limb. Save non-Christians and very progressive theologians, support for this conclusion is less enthusiastic, to be sure. I rate Misreading Judas: How Biblical Scholars Missed the Biggest Story of All Time 4 out of 4 stars. If you are open-minded and are interested in biblical history or Eastern mysticism, I think you will be fast captivated by this book. If you are outraged by Wahler’s conclusions, you might enjoy being engaged in what can only be described as the debate of the millennia. - Eva Darrington, Online Book Club

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